2017 Cost Recovery Update

25
Sep

27 September: Cost Recovery Update

Fall Chum: There has been some cost recovery at both Neets Bay and Burnett Inlet (see table and graphics), but at this point we are taking all fall chum that return to the Barrier at Neets Bay or the steep pass at Burnett as brood.  We have seen some current harvest distant from Neets  (D101) and Burnett (D106), but there are no current indicators “out there” of the volume on the way – and It may small.  Broodstock isn’t currently accumulating in any large numbers and most of the fish that are there are not yet very interested in entering fresh water.   We have only collected between 5 and 6 million eggs total the fall chum (at Neets and Burnett), of a goal of about 35 million.

The return of summer and fall chum will not be large enough to meet the 2017 revenue goal.   This was anticipated as the forecast return was insufficient to reach that number and the return has been very close to what was forecast.

Klawock Lake Coho: Cost recovery harvest continues at Klawock.  So far about 15,500 fish have been harvested.  We anticipate cost recovery at Klawock to go on for at least several more weeks into early October.

 

18 September: Cost Recovery Update

The SSRAA summer chum run is over.  Summer chum egg take is done at both Neets Bay and Burnett Inlet.  Egg take goals were met with slightly more than 155 million eggs was taken at Neets and more than 8 million were taken at Burnett.

Neets: The fall chum have yet to move to the inner part of Neets Bay.  There has been some cost recovery (see table and graphics), but the primary fall chum run has not yet seen the need to enter fresh water.  This is true at both Neets Bay and Burnett Inlet.  There are some obvious schools of fish at each location.  We won’t harvest much at either location until broodstock is in hand…at both sites.  Very few corridors back to Neets are currently being fished; in a sense we are still running blind on this one.  The chum troll fishery will be closed on the 20th, this Wednesday.  That is our last indicator fishery on the Neets fish.  There are no current indicators “out there” of what is on the way.

The fall chums have also moved into Burnett Inlet. We hope to take half, or more, of the fall chum eggs there.  There may also be some small measure of fall chum cost recovery harvest at Burnett if there are extra fish; but that may or may not occur as there are only 3’s and 4’s in this year’s return to Burnett.

The return of summer and fall chum will not be large enough to meet the 2017 revenue goal.   This was anticipated as the forecast return was insufficient to reach that number and the return has been very close to what was forecast.

Snow Pass Coho: the summer coho run is over.  Some of these fish were harvested for cost recovery at both Burnett Inlet Hatchery and in Neck Creek.  The data is attached.  We did not meet the modest 2017 harvest goal.  Similar to our fall coho releases, coho have not survived well in southern SE the past two years.

Klawock Lake Coho: Cost recovery harvest continues at Klawock. So far about 11,000 fish have been harvested.  We anticipate cost recovery at Klawock to go on for at least several more weeks and probably into early October.

 

 

10 September: Cost Recovery Update

The SSRAA summer chum run is over.  Summer chum egg take is done at both Neets Bay and Burnett Inlet.  Egg take goals were met with slightly more than 155 million eggs was taken at Neets and more than 8 million were taken at Burnett.

Neets: the first fall chum were harvested for cost recovery yesterday, 10 September, about 6,000 fish.  The fish entered  the inner bay later than last year; this timing isn’t unusual.  The run looks to be primarily male at this point, more than 60%.  Very few corridors back to Neets are currently being fished; in a sense we are running blind on this one.  We will only be able to understand what is happening as we catch the fish in Neets Bay or as they are harvested by trollers in front of the bay.  There are no indicators “out there” of what is on the way.

The fall chums have also moved into Burnett Inlet. We hope to take half, or more, of the fall chum eggs there.  There may also be some small measure of fall chum cost recovery harvest at Burnett if there are extra fish; but that may or may not occur as there are only 3’s and 4’s in this year’s return to Burnett.

The return of summer and fall chum will not be large enough to meet the 2017 revenue goal.   This was anticipated as the forecast return was insufficient to reach that number and the return has been very close to what was forecast.

Snow Pass Coho: the summer coho run is over.  Some of these fish were harvested for cost recovery at both Burnett Inlet Hatchery and in Neck Creek.  The data is attached.  We did not meet the modest 2017 harvest goal.  Similar to our fall coho releases, coho have not survived well in southern SE the past two years.

Klawock Lake Coho: Cost recovery harvest has just started at Klawock. So far about 4,560 fish have been harvested over four harvest days.  We anticipate cost recovery at Klawock to go on for at least several more weeks and probably into early October.

 

5 September: Cost Recovery Update

The SSRAA summer chum run is over. There was one clean up harvest this past week at both Neets and Burnett.  Almost all the fish caught this week were fall chums.

Summer chum egg take is done at both Neets Bay and Burnett Inlet.  An estimate of slightly more than 155 million eggs was taken at Neets and more than 8 million were taken at Burnett.

Neets is currently between runs and there are very few fish in the inner bay.  The fall chums have moved into Burnett Inlet.  We hope to take half, or more, of the fall chum eggs at Burnett Inlet.  There may also be some small measure of fall chum cost recovery harvest at Burnett if there are extra fish; but that may not occur as there are only 3’s and 4’s in this year’s return to Burnett.  Unlike summer chum, often more than half the fall chum return is comprised of 5’s.  Cost recovery and broodstock collection will probably start at Neets Bay mid-week, depending on run timing.

The return of summer and fall chum will not be large enough to meet the 2017 revenue goal.   This was anticipated as the forecast return was insufficient to reach that number and the return has been very close to what was forecast.

Snow Pass Coho: there has been yet one more “one last harvest” of Snow Pass Coho at the end of last week.  There was also a clean-up harvest of summer coho at Burnett as the summer chums were cleaned up after egg take.  At this point, we anticipate that this will be the actual last “last” harvest of these fish. We will not meet the modest 2017 harvest goal.  Similar to our fall coho releases, summer coho have not survived well in southern SE the past two years.  They have the same run timing and meet the same ocean conditions as pink salmon…and the pinks did not do well.

 

21 August: Cost Recovery Update

The summer chum run is over but for the last handful of fish at the barrier in Neets Bay. There was some harvest this week (20,200 fish) and some broodstock collection (8,500 fish).

We were in good condition, with surplus brood behind the barrier, until the current weather event. It’s possible there are enough fish still viable in the raceways and entry to the raceways to reach the egg take goal.  We are currently waiting several days for these last fish to ripen.  There will be a few fish remaining outside the barrier until we fish again next week.  At this point they are much safer outside the barrier because of the flow in Neets Creek. The target for Neets Bay is 155 million summer chum eggs.  Last week we noted that this is about the maximum we can reach without being a little lucky – or even a lot lucky.  Today it looks like a little luck with the weather would not hurt.  Whatever the outcome, at worst we will be very close.

We don’t anticipate much additional cost recovery harvest of summer chums, if any, before the fall chum arrive

The return of summer and fall chum will not be large enough to meet the 2017 revenue goal.   This was not unanticipated as the forecast was not sufficient to reach that number and the return will be very close to what was forecast.  In a truly rare event, the forecast for the terminal return to Neets Bay is almost exactly what occurred – just a few thousand fish different at this point.  This was at least in part lucky as there isn’t enough data available related to the survival of these fish to expect that precision…and, of course if this was our last forecast, we could leave and claim that there was…but there isn’t.

Snow Pass Coho: there is one last harvest of Snow Pass Coho going on as I type.  We will not meet the modest 2017 harvest goal.  The market wants these fish; there simply have not been enough of them the past two years, which reflects the general lower-than-usual coho survival on the south end.  In essence these fish faced the same spring conditions as the pink salmon that have failed to return to south end systems in 2017.

The harvest of chinook at Whitman Lake, incidental to brood stock collection, was about what was anticipated.

There are also a handful of summer coho being harvested during the first summer chum egg take at Burnett. This is ongoing and we will include these numbers on future reports.

Summer Chum Egg Take at Neets Bay: Today, Saturday 19 August, we took about 2 million eggs out of the raceways at Neets to make space for those fish that can recruit before passage to the raceways becomes unpassable, as it might become with the current weather later today or tomorrow.  A relatively high percentage of the fish are not yet ready to spawn.  At this point in recruitment taking more eggs with the current % of green females would result in fewer total eggs.  They should be sufficiently ripe on Monday to continue.  About 136 million eggs have been collected with about 19 million to go to meet the goal. This is certainly not the first time we have faced a difficulty with broodstock because of the flow in Neets Creek, but it is the first time this has had an impact on the summer chum egg take.  This situation has become an annual event in the fall…perhaps with this happening now; it will give us a pass this fall.

Burnett Inlet: Some of you may be following events at Burnett.  We have installed a “new concept” egg taking station.  Currently they have taken at least 8 million eggs at Burnett.  It appears that the run at Burnett is over.  The optimistic goal was between 6 and 8 million eggs, and that was reached.

 

14 August: Cost Recovery Update

The terminal run at Neets Bay has slowed again. Most of the fish we touched this past week went across the barrier for brood stock.   We are in good condition for brood and with the recent rain the fish are moving into the brood raceways as fast as we can keep up with them.  The % female in the brood is higher than usual this year which helps with egg collection.  The target for Neets Bay is 155 million summer chum eggs.  This is about the maximum we can reach without being a little lucky – or even a lot lucky.  Had the weather not changed this past weekend, despite having the brood behind the barrier, it may not have been possible to reach the goal.

We don’t anticipate much more cost recovery harvest of summer chums as we are running out of fish. But, we will continue to harvest; there are still fish in the outer bay so there will be some sporadic harvest between the summer and fall fish; at best we are filling part of a tender on a day’s fishing.

It is very unlikely the return of summer and fall chum will be large enough to meet the 2017 revenue goal.   This was not unanticipated as the forecast was not sufficient to reach this number and the return will be very close to what was forecast.

Snow Pass Coho: there was one more harvest of Snow Pass Coho this past week.  Regardless, we will not meet the modest 2017 harvest goal.  The market wants these fish; there simply have not been enough of them the past two years, which reflects the general lower-than-usual coho survival on the south end.  In essence these fish faced the same spring conditions as the pink salmon that have failed to return to south end systems in 2017.

The harvest of chinook at Whitman Lake, incidental to brood stock collection, was about what was anticipated.

Summer Chum Egg Take at Neets Bay: by the end of today, Monday 14 August, we will have about 104 million eggs in the hatchery.  With the rain this past weekend, fish are recruiting about as fast as we can take the eggs.  There is sufficient brood behind the barrier and in the creek and raceways such that this should continue through the week.  If that happens, we will be at the egg take goal next weekend.

Burnett Inlet: Some of you may be following events at Burnett.  We have installed a “new concept” egg taking station.  It was tested for the first time with a spawn of about 300 females, 750,000 eggs, at the end of last week.  Currently they have taken at least 3.5 million eggs at Burnett and what fish are there should recruit quickly in the current weather situation.  We don’t anticipate taking a lot of eggs at the site, though we are hoping for from 6 to 8 million.  We’ll keep you informed.

 

5 August: Cost Recovery Update

Cost recovery harvest slowed again this past week. There are fish in the outer bay, but probably because of the current weather situation they have been slow to move in to the barrier seine.  Harvest is confined to the area near the barrier as we will continue to collect brood stock through the next week or 10 days.  We generally collect brood fish over a three week period and that is going as planned.  During the past week an estimated 37,642 fish were harvested for cost recovery with about 18,500 going across the barrier for brood stock.  The total cost recovery harvest to date is an estimated 478,714 summer chums.  A total of 130,900 fish have been put over the barrier for brood.

Currently we anticipate needing 20,000 to 30,000 additional fish for brood stock. With any luck we will only need about 160,000 fish (as currently estimated) this year as the % female was greater when we started brood collection. Making the egg take goal can take close to 200,000 brood fish if males predominate in collection – something we can’t necessarily control.  But, that has not been the case this summer.

Cost recovery harvest is unlikely to meet the 2017 revenue goal, including the harvest of fall chum and coho.

Snow Pass Coho: though there are still some fish to be harvested at Whale Pass, we will not meet the modest 2017 harvest goal.  The market wants these fish in 2017; there simply have not been enough of them.

The harvest of chinook at Whitman Lake, incidental to brood stock collection, is about what was anticipated.

Summer Chum Egg Take at Neets Bay: Today, Saturday 5 August, we are in the 11th day of egg taking at Neets Bay and will have taken about 34 million eggs.  Normally on the 11th day we would have about 60 million eggs.  For whatever reason, probably a conspiracy of weather and tides, the fish have been reluctant to enter the brood raceways.  Brood stock behind the barrier is sufficient and healthy, simply not ready to spawn.  We anticipate things moving with the next weather event, or when hormones overwhelm reluctance.  At this point we are not overly concerned.

Burnett Inlet: Some of you may be following events at Burnett.  We have installed a “new concept” egg taking station.  It was tested for the first time with a spawn of about 300 females, 750,000 eggs, at the end of last week.  The final step in evaluation will be assessment of the survival to the eyed stage of the eggs taken.  Egg taking will continue at Burnett, but because only 3-year-olds from a modest release are returning this year: we don’t anticipate taking a lot of eggs at the site.  We’ll keep you informed.

 

 

 

30 July: Cost Recovery Update

Cost recovery harvest moderated some this past week as brood collection became a priority. An estimated 117,153 fish were harvested for cost recovery with about 76,400 going across the barrier for brood stock.  The total cost recovery harvest to date is an estimated 441,072 fish.  A total of 120,000 fish have been put over the barrier for brood.

Currently we anticipate needing approximately 50,000 additional fish for brood stock. The summer chum return normally continues into mid-August, but we are clearly past the peak at this time.  We were more effective harvesting fish earlier in the return in 2017, which moved the apparent peak to an earlier period…the actual return of fish was likely very similar to the historic pattern.

We will make meeting brood stock needs a priority, and that should be relatively easily accomplished. It is very unlikely we will meet the 2017 revenue goal during the summer chum return.

Snow Pass Coho: though harvest continues at Whale Pass, at this point it does not appear that we will meet the harvest goal.  There should be several additional harvests through the next three weeks.  The market wants these fish in 2017, there simply have not been enough of them.

24 July: Cost Recovery Update

Cost recovery harvest increased substantially again last week as we reach the normal mid-point timing for the terminal harvest. The harvest was 190,100 chums for the week, through Saturday 22 July.  The daily average weight of a chum is still between 9.8 and 10 pounds.  At this point we have harvested slightly less than half of what is needed to meet the revenue goal.  The peak point of the terminal return normally occurs on 25 – 29 July.

Broodstock collection began last week with 37,800 fish put across the barrier, about 20% of what is needed. The fish are put across the barrier seine in a deliberate pattern through a period of about two and a half weeks. This facilitates egg collection which occurs over a period of 3 to 4 weeks.

Please note that the graphics are a little misleading. Stat weeks don’t begin on the same date every year.  Regardless, it looks as if total return and harvest are ahead of projections.  The final question is whether the run is simply early…we won’t know that until it is nearly over, but most of those things we can measure suggest the run timing is normal.

Snow Pass Coho: though harvest continues at Whale Pass, at this point it does not appear that we will meet the harvest goal.  There should be several additional harvests through the next three weeks.  The market wants these fish in 2017, there simply have not been enough of them.